Signs with registered English only trademarks in Québec? Not a problem if you have sufficient and visible French somewhere close by

Gayle Noble, Catherine Jenner and Tania Djerrahian -

On Wednesday May 4, 2016, the Québec Minister of Culture and Communications and Minister Responsible for the Protection and Promotion of the French Language, Hélène David, introduced draft amendments (the Proposed Amendments) to certain regulations under the Charter of the French Language (the Charter) to ensure the presence of French where commercial signs and posters display trademarks exclusively in a language other than French. This article provides some background relating to the Proposed Amendments as well as a summary of some of the key provisions.

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You can Google it: Supreme Court of Canada grants leave to appeal global injunction

Alex Sarabura - 

The Supreme Court of Canada has granted leave to hear an important case respecting the ability of Canadian courts to enjoin the behaviour of organizations with respect to their operations outside of Canada.

On February 18, 2016, the Supreme Court of Canada granted Google Inc. leave to appeal the judgment of the British Columbia Court of Appeal in Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Google Inc., in which the BCCA upheld an interlocutory injunction prohibiting Google from including specific websites in its search results worldwide.

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Cyber-attacks: why any business may be at risk and five possible ways to address the risks

Vanessa Coiteux - 

In this article, Stikeman Elliott’s Vanessa Coiteux reminds us that the risk of cyber-attack is by no means confined to businesses in certain industries. She identifies five cybersecurity risk factors that apply to most or all businesses and discusses how to address them. These observations will be of particular interest to corporate directors who, as the article notes, increasingly have to take the risk of cyber-attacks into account – including in situations where the acquisition or sale of a business is being contemplated.

  • “This is not a big public company!”
  • “This is not a financial institution or a retail company!”
  • “There must be more valuable information to hack out there!”
  • “Putting cybersecurity measures in place is costly!” 
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New EU-US Safe Harbour Agreement

Michael Decicco and Eryn Fanjoy

On February 2, 2016, the European Commission announced that it reached a deal to replace the EU-US Safe Harbour framework that was declared invalid last year by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU).  Referred to as the “EU-US Privacy Shield”, the new framework should provide businesses with guidance for the safe transfer of personal information of citizens of the European Union (EU) to the United States. 

Background

The CJEU declared the old Safe Harbour framework invalid on October 6, 2015.  Under the EU Data Protection Directive, the personal information of EU citizens can only be transferred from the EU to countries with adequate data protection standards. The old Safe Harbour agreement, negotiated between the European Commission and the United States Department of Commerce, was one of a number of mechanisms available to EU businesses to ensure there was an adequate level of protection when transferring personal data of EU citizens to the United States. One of the CJEU’s primary concerns with the old framework was the massive and indiscriminate surveillance of personal information of EU citizens in the United States, which was viewed as incompatible with the “fundamental rights” of EU citizens. 

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Ontario Superior Court creates new privacy tort in revenge porn case

Justine Johnston -

On January 21, 2016, the Ontario Superior Court released its decision in Doe 464533 v D, 2016 ONSC 541, recognizing for the first time the new privacy tort of public disclosure of private facts. The Court’s decision explicitly expands the common law protection of privacy and demonstrates how courts can recognize and provide relief to victims of cyberbullying.

The public disclosure of private facts tort arose from an egregious case of revenge porn cyberbullying. The defendant posted a sexually explicit video of the plaintiff under the user submission section of a pornographic website. When the plaintiff became aware that the video had been posted online, the defendant admitted to uploading it and removed it from the website. Although the video was “removed”, the Court acknowledged that there is no way to know how many times it was viewed or downloaded or if and how many times it may have been copied onto other media storage devices or recirculated. 

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CRTC executes another raid in malware investigation

David Elder - 

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has announced the execution of another warrant under Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL), this time at two locations in the Niagara region of Ontario.

This is only the second such warrant executed by the CRTC under the anti-spam law.  As in a recent previous announcement respecting the execution of a similar warrant, the warrant was issued as part of an ongoing investigation, and the party that was the subject of the warrant was not identified.

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CRTC battles forces of dorkness, takes action against notorious botnet

David Elder - 

In the second such announcement in less than a week, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has publicly announced an advanced investigative action -- this time against an unnamed organization suspected of involvement in the distribution the notorious and widely distributed Win32/Dorkbot malware.

The CRTC announced that, with the assistance of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), it had served its first-ever warrant under Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) to “take down” a command-and-control server located in Toronto, Ontario as part of what the Commission has characterized as a coordinated international effort.

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Fourteen not-so-simple rules for implementing a BYOD program

Kelly O'Ferrall -    

In case you missed it over the summer, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, together with the Alberta and British Columbia Privacy Commissioners, teamed up to create guidelines (the Guidelines) to address what employers should consider when implementing policies that allow employees to use their own mobile devices for both work and personal purposes (i.e., a Bring Your Own Device or BYOD policy).

Employers often cite cost savings and convenience as reasons for instituting BYOD policies. Further, as employees are quite often already using their own devices for business purposes (or their work devices for personal purposes), implementing a formal BYOD policy allows employers to clarify the rules and expectations with respect to such use.  Notwithstanding the apparent benefits of having a BYOD arrangement, the Guidelines convey an underlying message that such arrangements should be approached with caution in light of the requirements contained in applicable privacy legislation. Specifically, the obligation to maintain the security of personal information.

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Whither the "Nigerian Prince"? Another Canadian business pays penalty under anti-spam law

David Elder - 

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications (CRTC) has announced its third settlement for alleged violations of the anti-spam law, and again, the announcement relates to a well-known Canadian business, rather than an indiscriminate or malicious spammer.

In this most recent case, Rogers Media Inc. (RMI) agreed to pay an Administrative Monetary Penalty of $200,000 as part of an undertaking to resolve alleged violations of Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL).

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EU-US safe harbour for data transfers declared invalid - Canadian implications

Michael Decicco

On October 6, 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) invalidated the decision underlying the European Union’s (EU) safe harbor structure for cross-border data transfers from the EU to the United States in Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner of Ireland (Schrems).  Shortly following the CJEU’s decision, the Article 29 Data Protection Working Party (Working Party) issued a statement outlining its views as to the consequences of the CJEU decision in Schrems.  The decision may directly impact Canadian businesses which transfer data from the EU to the United States or which host data in the United States.

Safe Harbor and Schrems

Under the EU Data Protection Directive, personal information of EU citizens can only be transferred from the EU to countries with adequate data protection standards.  Safe Harbour, which was negotiated between the European Commission and the United States Department of Commerce, was one of a number of mechanisms available to EU companies to ensure there was an adequate level of protection when transferring personal data of EU citizens to the United States.  To benefit from Safe Harbour, a company was required to self-certify to the United States Department of Commerce that it complied with specified EU privacy standards. 

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Interlocutory Injunction in Trade-mark Infringement Action Upheld by Federal Court of Appeal

Justine Whitehead and Komil Joshi -

On April 23, 2015, in Jamieson Laboratories Ltd. v. Reckitt Benckiser LLC and Reckitt Benckiser (Canada) Limited 2015 FCA 104, the Federal Court of Appeal upheld a decision granting an interlocutory injunction against a defendant in a trademark infringement suit.  Successful motions for such interlocutory relief are relatively rare in the Federal Court, and this case provides some interesting insight into the type of evidence that might allow a moving party to obtain such relief.

Background Facts

The facts of the case have their origin in activities undertaken in 2012, when Reckitt Benckiser LLC and Reckitt Benckiser (Canada) Limited (Reckitt) decided to enter the North American market in respect of supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids.  In pursuit of this goal, Reckitt engaged both Schiff International, Inc. (Schiff) and Jamieson Laboratories Ltd. (Jamieson) in acquisition talks.

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Federal Court of Appeal clarifies Industrial Design Act

Justine Whitehead and Gina Demczuk - 

In Zero Spill Systems (Int’l) Inc. v Heide (Zero Spill), the Federal Court of Appeal (FCA) has clarified that a functional feature of an industrial design may be protected under the Industrial Design Act.

The underlying action involved four plaintiffs, and concerned allegations of patent and industrial design infringement with respect to fluid containment apparatuses that were manufactured and distributed by the defendants (referred to collectively herein as “the Heide Defendants”) for use in oil field operations.  While many arguments with respect to patent infringement were raised at the Federal Court and FCA, this post will focus solely on the arguments with respect to the industrial designs. 

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Airline hits turbulence from CRTC: pays penalty for violations of anti-spam law

David Elder - 

In the most recently announced settlement under Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation, the CRTC has announced that Porter Airlines Inc. has agreed to pay $150,000 as part of an undertaking concerning alleged violations of the law.

The CRTC’s summary of the undertaking indicates that Porter sent commercial electronic messages:

  • without an unsubscribe mechanism or with an unsubscribe mechanism that was not set out “clearly and prominently”, as required by the Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations (CRTC) (the Regulations).  In this regard, the CRTC noted that some of the messages contained two unsubscribe links, only one of which was functional.  In the CRTC’s view, the unsubscribe mechanism was not clearly set out, as it was not apparent which mechanism was functional
  • without complete identification information required by the Regulations
  • without proof of consent to send commercial electronic messages to some of the recipients
  • to at least one recipient who had previously indicated they wanted to unsubscribe.  The CRTC found that the unsubscribe request was not given effect within 10 business days, as required by the Act
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Snoops and gossips beware: Ontario Government to introduce stiffer measures to protect patient privacy

Recently, the Government of Ontario announced its intent to strengthen the rules protecting patient privacy. If passed, these amendments to the Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA) would include:

  • Mandatory reporting of privacy breaches to the Privacy Commissioner and potentially the regulatory colleges;
  • Allow individuals to more easily prosecute offences under PHIPA by removing the 6 month limitation period following an alleged privacy breach;
  • Increasing institutional fines for offences from $250,000 to $500,000;
  • Increasing individual fines for offences from $50,000 to $100,000; and
  • Clarifying how and when healthcare providers may collect, use and disclose personal health information contained in electronic health records.
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Privacy Commissioner study finds compliance gaps with online behavioural advertising

David Elder - 

New research released by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) suggests that most advertising organizations placing behaviourally targeted online advertising are meeting privacy requirements, although the report also suggests there are a number of areas for improvement.

The study showed that most advertising organizations are providing some form of notification to users, as well as an opt-out mechanism; however, the research also suggests that some opt-out procedures can be confusing or cumbersome, and some of the advertising organizations are continuing to serve ads based on sensitive topics.

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